Recent Posts

IMPC Cares: What cancer screening tests are recommended for you?

Do you know the current cancer screening recommendations for yourself and your loved ones? Here are the Cancer Prevention Screening  and Early Detection Guidelines of the American Cancer Society. Guidelines take into consideration your current age, as well as your genetics and specific medical history.

cancer screening

Terri Pounders, FNP-BC, Internal Medicine & Pediatric Clinic, New Albany

Breast Cancer:

Women under the age 40 years: Discuss with your primary care provider your best options for preventive breast care screenings
Women age 40-44 years: Have the choice to start annual mammograms if they wish to do so
Women age 45 to 54 years: Should get a mammogram every year
Women 55 years and older: Should switch to mammograms every 2 years or can continue yearly screenings

  • Because of family history and personal factors, she will possibly need to have a mammogram along with MRI
  • Every woman should perform monthly self-breast exams
  • Every woman should know how their breasts look and feel, and please report any possible changes to a health care provider as soon as possible
  • All women need to discuss with their primary care provider their genetic, personal, and family history for further concerns about their preventive breast cancer screenings

Cervical Cancer:

Women at age 21 years: should start cervical cancer screenings, pap smears
Women age 22-29 years: should have a pap smear completed ever 3 years (If any Pap smear test is abnormal- a HPV testing should also be completed)
Women age 30-65 years: should have a Pap smear pulse HPV testing done every 5 years
Women age 66 years and older: no pap smear is needed if she has had normal testing in the past 10 years

  • If there is a history of cervical cancer or cervical pre-cancerous cells, she should have testing for at least 20 yrs after the diagnosis, even if that exceeds age 65 years old
  • If a total hysterectomy (uterus and cervix removed) has been completed for reasons not related to cancer, no further cervical cancer screenings are recommended
  • All women are encouraged to obtain vaccines against HPV according to their age guidelines
  • All women need to discuss with their primary care provider their genetic, personal, and family history for further concerns about their preventive cervical cancer screenings

Colon Cancer:

Men and women age 50 years and older options:

  • A colonoscopy every 10 years or
  • Obtain a CT colongramphy every 5 years (this is a virtual colonoscopy) or
  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years or
  • Double-contrast barium enema every 5 years

Men and women age 50 years and older also should:

  • Complete yearly fecal immunochemical test (fit) or
  • Stool DNA test every 3 years or
  • Yearly guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests (fob cards)
    (If any of these are positive, colonoscopy should be completed)
  • All men and women need to discuss with their primary care provider their genetic, personal, and family history for further concerns about their preventive colon cancer screenings
  • All men and women with a family history of colon cancer need to discuss their preventive screenings prior to age 50 years old

Lung Cancer:

The American Academy does not recommend screening for lung cancer in people who are at average risk.

Men and women age 55 to 74 years old: Options for low dose CT scan of chest:

  • Have at least a 30 pack years smoking history and are still smoking or have quit within the last 15 years
    • All women need to discuss with their primary care provider their genetic, personal, and family history for further concerns about their preventive lung cancer screenings

Prostate Cancer:

Men age 50 years and older: Options for prostate cancer screenings are psa levels and digital rectal exams (prostate exam)

  • There is much debate about whether psa labs should be completed- discuss with your primary care provider
  • yearly digital rectal exams are encouraged for all males over the age of 50 years old
  • African Americans or male with family history of prostate cancer in father or brother need to discuss with their primary care provider their options prior to age 50 years
  • All men need to discuss with your health care provider the risks and benefits of screening for prostate cancer when considering their genetic, personal, and family history

Terri Pounders, FNP-BC, is a Family Nurse Practitioner at the Internal Medicine & Pediatric Clinic (IM&PC) in New Albany.

%d bloggers like this: